Bazooka Zero Hits LP Review

Single, EP and Album Reviews, Uncategorized
Bazooka; Credit Sarah

Athens-based psychedelic punk outfit, Bazooka

Bazooka shook us up last year with their turbulent psychedelic EP: ‘Zougla’ (‘Jungle’ released Nov 2017) – in case you missed it, here’s our review. Their chaotic and acidic punk 4-track EP has now given birth to this completely face-melting full-length record, Zero Hits.

Returning this January with their 3rd LP – and for the month that’s in it, it’s been the most well timed irreverent psych-punk record to lift those ominous clouds.

Their lead single: ‘Fylaki’ (‘Prison’) in the bands words: “..was born from the thought that we are seemingly free, yet we are locked up in our own mental cell. You know, we create our personal hell and we don’t even know it. And some of us even believe that it’s a place of love and happiness.”

The Athens based four-piece have irrepressible passion, and you cannot help but feed off their contagious energy. Singing entirely in their Greek mother tongue is of no barrier, sonically, you will appreciate just how ambitious and different their sound is; driving surf-rock crossed with new wave and laced with fuzzy guitar riffs. It would certainly find a fitting home on BBC Radio 6 Music – a refreshing spin for Steve Lamacq’s Roundtable we reckon!

Bazooka LP Artwork; George Chandrinos.jpeg

Bazooka LP artwork credit; George Chandrinos

Zero Hits (released via Inner Ear Records) is out now: Inner Ear RecordsiTunesBandCamp

Follow Bazooka on: Facebook // Twitter // Instagram

Words: Rachael Crabtree (@eccentric_eejit)

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The False and the Fair Whelans, Dublin Live Review

Live Reviews, Uncategorized
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The False and The Fair; EP launch at Whelans, Dublin (18-11-2018); photo credit: imagery.by.ro

Despite the late switch to the larger venue tonight, there wasn’t much room to move in Whelans for The False and The Fair’s EP launch. Ahead of the main event, we were treated to fantastic support from Aisling Jarvis and a solo performance from Vernon Jane.

The False and The Fair arrived on stage to the ambient glow of a projector showing off their new EP artwork, kicking off with their always popular “Blue Bottles Blues”. The catchy riff helped set the tone for the evening as they passionately launched into their ever increasing and established repertoire.

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It’s hard to pin down a genre for The False and the Fair, they play their unique and brand of hard rocking blues-folk but they are not afraid to branch out into different styles with the likes of “Psychedelic Smile” (which features on the new EP) that wouldn’t be out of place on a Radiohead album.

 

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They were joined by a host of guests on the stage during the night, including the familiar face of Emily Jane from Vernon Jane who jumped in to lend her vocals to the fan favourite: “Bald Apes” (just as she had done on the recorded version).

The evening drew to a close with one encore, the lead (and personal highlight) track lifted from their EP: “The Space in Between”. The band were joined on stage by a trio of backing singers which enhanced their already expansive sound, giving an edge fans hadn’t seen before. All in all, it was yet another great set from the South Dublin band which certainly piqued interest here tonight – there’s really no limit to how far these guys can go!

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Their new EP: ‘The Space In-Between’ is out now!

FOLLOW THE FALSE AND THE FAIR ON: SPOTIFY // TWITTER // FACEBOOK // INSTAGRAM

WORDS: Niall McDermott: @NiallMcDermott7

Photos: Róisín: Imagery By Ró

The False And The Fair Interview

Interviews, Uncategorized

The False and the Fair press shot 1 2018 - photo credit Joanna O'Malley

We spoke to The False And The Fair who were in the heart of Hell Fire Studios recording their latest single: ‘The Space In-between’ lifted from their eponymous EP (released 16th Nov) ahead of what will be an epic headline show at Whelans tomorrow (18th Nov).

The lads have a great way of volarising nature and romanticising the otherwise mundane band origins, inspiration and recording processes, and are proud to be belong to Dublin’s thriving music scene. For us, their record is an exquisite slow prog-rock burner with warm harmonies and transfixing layers of psychedelic guitar lines that just narrate the EP so well.

Rachael: I was gutted to narrowly miss you playing The Crow Bar when I was last over in Dublin – how did the night go, and generally speaking, how do you find the local music scene – where’s your favourite haunt to play?

Jacob: The crowbar gig was great. We stripped back all the songs, took away the drum kit and rearranged some of them to suit the more acoustic vibe we were going for. The crowd were really attentive and respectful too which is nice when you’re trying something new.

There are times when it can feel like parts of the songs, such as the harmonies, can get lost during gigs so it was nice to expose those a bit more and put the songs in a new context. I got to play a wooden box that Adam found in a warehouse so I enjoyed the challenge of playing the same songs in a different way on a different instrument.

The music scene here is booming. There are so many new bands being born every day and they’re all so different. No matter what type of music you play everyone just seems really supportive and encouraging. Having colleges such as BIMM Dublin and Newpark jazz has made people realise that they can actually have a career in this industry and it’s very encouraging to see you friends succeed at doing what they love.

Tommy: In terms of venues, we’ve had fun playing all over. Workmans, Sin E and the Grand Social are all great spots, as well as Whelan’s where we’re launching this new EP. The Harbour Bar in Bray also has a special place in our hearts. We’ve got roots in Bray as well as Dublin so it’s always nice to come back to that home crowd.

Your origins of the band sound awfully romantic…atop the Wicklow Mountains at dawn, which feed seamlessly into the outdoors themes of this EP. I suppose coming from such a beautiful country it’s inevitable that you become consumed by it’s natural beauty – can you continue the story as romantically as possible please, haha…

T: I can try, although the songs on the EP might do a better job of it! There is something about being out in nature, isn’t there? You just feel so big and small and lost and hopeful and peaceful all at the same time, and it’s nice to have space to breathe and think. There’s something about the headspace of writing songs that I always connect with the outdoors, even though I’m usually inside when I write. I think looking out at something bigger than yourself is one of the major themes with this collection of songs, so hopefully some of that energy comes through. You’re not just yourself; you’re part of a living, breathing world and it’s too easy to get stuck inside your head sometimes. I hope people will be able to put this EP on and let their minds wander a bit.

You dropped a reference to Townes Van Zandt – I’d love for you to share with us more what this American artist means to you as a band?

T: Townes is the man. Listening to him up in the mountains that morning definitely helped spark the creative energy that ultimately led to this EP coming together. There’s such an aching beauty to his writing, a real rawness and a yearning quality that I find utterly breathtaking. A lot of it’s really sad actually, but whatever way his voice hit me that morning just made me appreciate what I’ve got and where I was at.

Psychedelia seems the compass of TFATF’s sound – are there many likeminded souls that you’ve collaborated with/do you find yourself part of a scene, inspiring, jamming and gigging together?

Adam: I think we’ve been really lucky with the people we’ve gotten to collaborate with over the years.  We’ve all been huge Vernon Jane fans since seeing their first show, so getting Emily-Jane O’Connor to lend her voice to Bald Apes made us all a bit giddy. Having been a part of the BIMM scene, we got a chance to mingle with tonnes of unbelievable musicians. Through the college we met Laura O’Sullivan and Claire Z, who provided vocals for the last half of The Space In Between and have really promising projects of their own.

Ultimately though, I think we’re still trying to find our place in the broader Dublin music scene. No one here wants to be pigeonholed, which is amazing because you end up getting some really incredible genre-bending acts like Wastefellow and Fehdah, but it can also be a bit of a pain when you’re trying to put a show together! Ultimately I think it becomes more about quality over genre at a certain point though.

Cormac: When I joined the band, there seemed to be an established sound that I felt was very organic yet unprotected. Knowing that we had mutual interests, I felt that as we progressed we would be comfortable exploring each of our individual personalities as musicians. I think it’s evident that we all like psychedelic music to one degree or another, but we aren’t psych rockers. We enjoy much more of the genre’s soft, playful nature but you’ll get the occasional freak-out. Collaborations are always fun, Emily’s vocal on ‘Bald Apes’ is amazing. That section would have suffered without her. We’re currently taking on a lot more as individuals when it comes to the recordings. Rather than feature a new musician, we might try out something new ourselves. We like to experiment with different instruments and effects because it’s a lot of fun.

Have you ever heard of TAU – only discovered the artist myself recently (Shaun Mulroney is the mastermind behind the project) and they’re actually heading over to Dublin next month, I could really see your soundscapes sitting well together! 🙂

A: I hadn’t, I can definitely see what you mean though! Myself and Cormac are big fans of a Swedish psychedelic band called Goat and there are a lot of similarities there. We might have to shoot him a message!

The False and the Fair Space EP artwork by Grace Ryan

‘The Space In Between’ EP artwork by Grace Ryan

The guitar work is exquisite, I have to say, it’s warm progressive rock that just seems to narrate the EP so well – how do you each approach songwriting?

A: Tommy will come into our rehearsal room with the bones of a song and we’ll all sit around feeling out the track and throwing melodies about until we find something we like and the vibe sits right. Once we all have an idea for our main parts, we’ll start arranging it and adding little flourishes and accents – we’re basically just kids with crayons and a colouring book at that stage.

J: We’ve all played together for so long that when we work on new material it all comes quite naturally. We know what we like and we know what to expect from each other from a musical standpoint. We’re at a stage where we can trust each other and nobody is afraid to try something to see if it works.

C: When writing guitar parts I usually try to hear what the music is telling me. I hear how the lads gravitate to it and I find a way to make my own emotional tie to the sound. That said, we’ve all had a hand in writing the main riffs on this EP. I tend to become very attached to the sounds that I develop in the early stages of an arrangement. If it works I usually don’t try to push it too much, but there’s always room to explore new ideas.

T: I spend a lot of time writing by myself so it’s always a joy to get together with the guys and play. The more they contribute creatively the better, as far as I’m concerned. We’ve had a lot of fun writing together in the same room recently, so I hope some of those songs take shape and find their way onto future projects.

You’ve included ‘Gone’ on this EP which you previously released as a single, this song must bear a particular weighting – what does this song mean to you? 

T: Gone Tomorrow’s one of those songs that’s been with us forever, must have been the second or third song we ever worked on as a group and it’s certainly the oldest song remaining in our set these days. I think we’ve all got a certain fondness for it and it helped define our sound early on, to some extent. We released it last year but it was out on its own, and since it was just one track we only did an online release for it. We decided we’d like to have it on this collection for the blessed souls who want to buy our CDs and listen to the tracks that way, and when we realised that it worked nicely leading directly on from our new song ‘Psychedelic Psmile’ we knew that was the perfect place for it.

Would it be fair to say that you’re recognised by your most popular track: Bald Apes, which is very different sound to where you’re at with this EP, two years on, would you agree, not least in reference to the vocals (screamed to gentle-vocal hooks)? Can you talk us through this journey?

A: I think Bald Apes has always felt like a bit of an outlier for us tonally. It was written around the same time as Gone Tomorrow and In The Shade of the Mountain, yet it has this totally different perspective and scope. We’ve always been open to experimentation and I think back then we were still very much crafting our collective voice. I’m really proud of what we came up with, considering we actually recorded it 2 years prior to releasing it. This last year has really helped me to understand our dynamic and the direction we’re going in together, but I think that our recent musical development has had a lot to do with the shedding of pretense, a new level of openness, and a mutual acceptance of our individual voices and talents.

T: For me, I just thought Apes was one of our strongest songs at the time. As Adam says, we didn’t necessarily know what direction things were going for us musically. We decided to just go for it with a tune we were all excited about, and that seemed to have a great impact and energy when we played it live. I also won’t rule out more shouting in the future.

Even the location you chose to record your EP was in the heart of the Dublin Mountains – Hellfire Studios, where some Dublin legends like Hozier and David Keenan have recorded – how was the experience?

A: We got really lucky actually, I was studying Music Production in Bray and it turned out one of my lecturers Ivan Jackman is heavily involved with the studio. We ended up recording In the Shade Of the Mountain, Gone Tomorrow and The Space In Between with his students as part of one of their assignments, then once we realised that we wanted to make this EP, we booked in another few days to lay down Another Life and Psychedelic Psmile. It’s not your typical stuffy studio and the distance from the city gives you an opportunity to really focus on what you’re doing. It’s amazing up there – totally secluded with this amazing view of the city and the sea! I think we all fell in love with the place. Besides, their gear is delish!

What elements of an era do you hear in your songs – whether they are conscious choices made or unconscious results?

J: As far as the drums are concerned I grew up listening to a lot of Nirvana, Tool and The Smashing Pumpkins. It may not come across in the songs too much but there are definitely elements of that mid-late 90’s angst in the drums. Another Life is the best example of that, I really let loose on that song.

T: In terms of a broad influence the most obvious reference is probably a late ‘60s, early ‘70s kind of vibe. The likes of Love, Pink Floyd and Neil Young would be touchstones for me, but we’ve got such varied musical interests within the group that I hope we’ve come up with something reasonably unique that stands on its own two legs. We recently put together a Spotify playlist featuring some of the tracks that influenced us on this EP and I’ve really enjoyed listening back over them and reflecting on where we’re coming from.

Check out their latest single: ‘The Space In-Between’, recorded live by Ivan Jackman at Hell Fire Studios:

Catch them live at Whelans tomorrow (18th Nov) €8.50 (Adv) €10

Follow The False and The Fair on: Spotify // Twitter // Facebook // Instagram

WORDS: RACHAEL CRABTREE (@ECCENTRIC_EEJIT)

Exhauster Interview

Interviews, Uncategorized
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Emerging South London-based Artist, Exhauster

We can’t keep it to ourselves when we discover artists we love, and this week we’re delighted to share with you an emerging artist, Exhauster. We caught up with the mastermind behind the project, Elliot, to discuss his latest single: ‘Stay Out’, a glimpse into his musical background and his attraction to the disparate elements of music.

Having been involved in many previous projects, the South London-based artist (via the US and Yorkshire) now finds himself in his first foray into singing and arranging his own songs. “I have been in bands as a drummer and general tradesman for ages but I started writing material for myself over the last couple of years which got some nice reactions from friends, so decided to keep going with it. My initial plan was to surround myself with sublime voices to paper over any cracks and we just kept papering on sounds until it became Exhauster.”

Speaking of his latest single, he reveals how it changed direction entirely, organically, for the better. “It was originally supposed to be a pretty relaxed, motorik little ditty, but somewhere down the line it started to get really frenetic and I’m still not 100% sure how the ending happened. We were originally only going to use some subtle drum machines, but I played around with the track in the studio when we were recording something else and accidentally recorded the drum parts”. Elliot goes on to jest: “I like assembling music in a kinda patchwork way. Actually I can only assemble music in a patchwork way.”

Just as we begin to speak of influences it becomes apparent that the style of his musical legends match that of where he wants to be with Exhauster. The ways boundaries of electronic and organic elements are pushed together in “really beautiful ways. I also love music that is obviously tooled to make disparate elements fit. You’re going to get a lot of that with Exhauster. We’re ultimately trying for something ecstatic, even if it’s a little sad.”

When tasked with the question of influences, Elliot intelligently lists many obscure almost esoteric bands, so niche, we love it! “Recently I have had the latest Serengeti album on repeat, which was produced by Andrew Broder from Fog, who are one of my favourite bands. The Daniel Brandt album “Eternal Something” that was released last month is also amazing. I’ve been really enjoying the latest album from the Declining Winter too.”

Keen to know when we might expect an EP to drop, satisfyingly it’s all recorded and he will be sharing things regularly every few weeks over the coming months, plus live dates are coming soon. “We have the personnel and I’m remembering how to play drums and guitar in front of people again. I’m really looking forward to that.”

The EP was produced by the multi-talented Nick Trepka (Emmy The Great) who, as he beams has “known and loved since we were very young lads. He brings much needed musicianship and discipline to the process. He is also useful in that he knows when I’m being objectionably out of tune. We have a lot of fun”. Nick, also plays guitars, bass and keys and sings backing vocals alongside, he adds, “another producer and musician of note, Grace Banks, who everyone should check out.”

As we begin to wrap things up, Elliot speaks fondly of his current home town, South London, and it’s local music scene. “But I’m a bit of a hermit working on my own thing at the moment and I don’t really know what is happening around me. The Windmill is the local place where you are likely to see interesting music though. Listen to OD Davey, I think he’s somewhere around here and he’s great.”

Follow Exhauster on: Spotify // Twitter // Facebook // Instagram 

WORDS: RACHAEL CRABTREE (@ECCENTRIC_EEJIT)

 

 

Jeremy Tuplin Interview

Interviews, Single, EP and Album Reviews, Uncategorized

Jeremy Tuplin Profle ShotThere’s a lot to be said for good humour – and Somerset born singer-songwriter Jeremy Tuplin certainly hits the spot with a balance of poignant delivery on his latest single: ‘Long Hot Summer’.

Perhaps it’s the upbeat melody supporting his dark lyrics, but parallels can definitely be drawn with the legends, Belle and Sebastian.

Intrigued to learn more about the great initiative of partnering and sharing all proceeds of his latest single with the environmental charity; Friends of the Earth, we caught up with Jeremy to discover more.

Your new single hits on global warming, an issue that universally affects us, but in all reality, not enough of us are actively resolving – do you think many convince themselves almost into believing our damage to the planet is unrepairable and don’t consider beyond their lifetime? — What are your thoughts on the issue? 

I don’t see the downside in taking measures to be kind to the planet. No matter what school of thought you adopt on the issue – why take the risk in not being environmentally considerate? It doesn’t impinge on your freedoms as it’s a choice, but it will make you feel more connected to nature and therefore better about yourself. Seems ok to me. Plus Earth is by far the best planet out of all the planets we’ve come across. The idea of living on Mars might sound cool but the reality would be s**t. Kepler 452b could be ok, but that’s quite far away.

The charity you’re collaborating with: Friends of the Earth is a great initiative – how did this come about? — Do you work/volunteer with them or an Environmental charity? 

I think it’s a good thing to be a friend of Earth, and because the song touches on that in its own way I thought it would make me feel good about myself to donate some of the proceeds to that cause. All purchases of the track on Bandcamp will go to that.

Having a good sense of humour sure is an asset to life – your style of delivery, particularly on this track, has poignant humour — what books, films, plays or comedies do you enjoy? 

I like a lot of different stuff… a lot of absurdist humour of late, Toast Of London recently for example. Most things seem fairly absurd and ridiculous to me so I tend to be drawn to art that emphasises that. I’m reading The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath at the moment and I like her style.

Would it be fair to say that space and science fuel your musical inspiration – so you watched a lot of space documentaries during the production of your debut album: ‘I Dreamt I Was An Astronaut’ — tell us more…

It’s fair to say that I went through a space phase when writing and recording that album. I guess with the new stuff I’m going through more of an Earth phase. I will definitely return to space at some point though, creatively speaking.

How has country and city life compared as a musician – do you ever find London is so saturated with music that it’s maybe difficult to gain enough support – how is the music scene back home in Somerset?

I’ve been living in London for coming up to 9 years I think, so my only experience of the music scene in Somerset was when I was just starting out at open mic nights and small folk clubs. Haven’t really played there since but I would like to – if any Somerset promoters want to book me then please get in touch. I play a lot of gigs in London though, there are loads of good venues and gig nights. Possibly true that people are more receptive and up for buying merch in other towns and on the continent, but London is still pretty great.

Jeremy Tuplin’s latest single, Long Hot Summer is out now and available on all platforms.

Join us at their next full band gig on 20th September at The Victoria, Dalston – a double headliner with Jemma Freeman & The Cosmic Something, full details here!

Jeremy TuplinWebsite // Twitter // Facebook // Spotify

WORDS: RACHAEL CRABTREE (@ECCENTRIC_EEJIT)

Hanging Valleys // Fortaleza Single Review

Single, EP and Album Reviews, Uncategorized
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Heart warming ambient trio, Hanging Valleys

There is something altogether calming and comforting about Hanging Valleys – one song lends itself to the next seamlessly. The London-based three-piece first caught our ear a little over a year ago at the beginning of their formation in 2016 and have since gone on to release a successful debut EP (10th March 2017) and attain an unprecedented 1.2 million streams on Spotify – that pools in fans of Bon Iver and Sigor Ros to James Vincent McMorrow, continues to grow.

Thom Byles, began as a solo artist but quickly realised the ambitious project at stake needed more than one musician and subsequently recruited Mike Phillips (guitar, vocals) and Alexis Meridol (beats, synthesiser) to produce his complete work of art.

Their choice of geographical reference follows through from their band name, Hanging Valleys (an erosional landform) to their style of playing, which in itself, mirrors nature; it is serene, delicate and enduring, swelling and shifting in it’s ambient patterns and a reassuring accompaniment to your minds path as you journey through day-to-day life.

Just as a river runs through Hanging Valleys, leading to a tremendous waterfall – the band’s music is a voyage that opens your mind to adventurous opportunities – you feel genuinely motivated to abandon plans and instead, go travelling – even it that means a long hike across dense woodland and the moors!

Fortaleza (or fortitude, as it translates from Spanish) is the first single to be lifted from Hanging Valleys’ forthcoming second EP. The song is about staying strong, weathering storms and having courage in the face of adversity. You cannot resist pairing their filmic sound with a moving picture of cliffs and costal plains – their layered harmonies surround you in a protective aura, just like the sun as it hits your closed eyes, instant warmth and positivity rivers through your veins.

Check out their accompanying video for their latest single released today (9th February 2018), below…live dates to follow!

HANGING VALLEYS // WEBSITE // TWITTER // FACEBOOK //

INSTAGRAM

WORDS: RACHAEL CRABTREE (@ECCENTRIC_EEJIT)

Tango With Lions // The Light // Album Review

Single, EP and Album Reviews, Uncategorized

THE LIGHT_DIGITAL; Tango With Lions; copyright

Nailing the mystical, and often minimal, is the Greek Singer-Songwriter, Katerina Papachristou and her band, Tango With Lions. Since we first heard their recent single: ‘Proof of Desire’ (lifted from their latest album: ‘The Light’) we were eagerly anticipating the records release. One of Greece’s biggest indie/folk bands mark their return with this third studio album, and on first listen the variation of styles strikes you as altogether madly intriguing and absolutely one of a kind.

The sparseness intensifies the records nine short stories of introspection. Darkness and light coexist steadily, sometimes more excessively than the other, better still, they are never alone, and that, is what gives it beauty – the acceptance of this reflects life itself, opposites cannot live without one another and nor can a decent record! By recognising the value and power of each other (dark and light) the listener attunes, and subsequently, bonds more closely to the music.

Tango With Lions; Press Shot; Eftychia Vlachou, copyright

Katerina Papachristou, the master-mind behind, Tango With Lions. Photographer: Eftychia Vlachou

Nine songs, each different in style, reaffirm that Tango With Lions’ music hinges on atmosphere, created through imagery and poetry. Tipping slowly on the albums eerily unsettling second track: ‘Proof of Desire’ and fully realised on the penultimate track, ‘The Go-Betweens’ is the symmetry with PJ Harvey – similarities lie within the eccentric art form of creating short stories through song craft and experimental instrumentalism.

The timing of this records release could not have arrived at a more apt time either – the light of New Year light nearly shadowed by the mid-winter bleakness until the irrepressible enthusiasm for the year ahead conquers all doubts of uncertainty: “…hush now between Winter and Spring…” Papachristou whispers on the penultimate track.

Concluding, with what sounds like, a cassette of French poetry playing alongside an accordion busker, alluring in it’s warnings and wisdom – this record grows on you as your intrigue unconsciously hits replay.

‘The Light’ was released via Inner Ear Records on 19th January 2018.

Tango With Lions // Website // Facebook // Twitter // Instagram

Words: RACHAEL CRABTREE (@ECCENTRIC_EEJIT)

Introducing // Flare Voyant

Uncategorized
Flare Voyant Press Photo

Psychedelic revivalists, Flare Voyant

There is something so completely timeless about the sound (and aesthetic) of the late 60s, early 70s, that it’s no wonder it’s been the inspiration for so many contemporary musicians. A new band that we discovered just before Christmas is the London-based four-piece, Flare Voyant, who rekindle vibes akin to both The Rolling Stones and The Doors. Their early demos caught the ear of legendary producer, Chris Kemsey (who is recognised for his work with the Stones) who recently went on to produce Flare Voyant’s debut EP (released November 2017).

They saw in the New Year by selling out Dalston’s Rocksteady (a gig we were sorry to miss out on) and are currently preparing videos for their EP tracks (due for release in the coming months). Here’s their most iconic single, Ephemeral Romance, lifted from their self titled EP:

Having realised their potential as a four-piece in early 2015, their effervescent blend of nationalities; Brazilian drummer Lucas Roxo, Greco-Italian-Brazilian guitarist Rod Bourganos, French singer Thomas Baignères and British bassist, George Hudson, have paved way for an iconic style, throwback yet distinctly their own. Their infectious EP effortlessly merges Psychedelia, Blues and Rock n’ Roll, with instrumental progressive jamming and the lead singer’s raspy bluesy overtones drawing them close in comparison at times, to not only The Doors, but to their contemporaries, White Denim – Flare Voyant have a strong alliance with 2018’s cosmos; we’re predicting big things from these!

Join us, by kicking back to their EP and by keeping your eyes peeled for 2018’s gig dates here!

Flare Voyant: Soundcloud // Instagram // Facebook

WORDS: RACHAEL CRABTREE (@ECCENTRIC_EEJIT)

 

Riley Pearce Interview // Introducing

Interviews, Uncategorized
Riley Pearce; Tashi Hall copyright

Hotly tipped talent, Riley Pearce

We caught up with a very special and unassuming alt-folk singer-songwriter, Riley Pearce, who’s on the rise, not least in his Australian homeland, but across the waters over here in Europe. It becomes evident that Pearce measures his true success through the people he is able to reach and their connection to his music as we discuss how significant busking is alongside maintaining a digital presence to both gain new followers of his music and push him on creatively.

Ahead of the release of his new EP, Pearce is touring his home country for the month of October before heading to the studio to finalise his record and launch into a full European and UK tour, Spring 2018.

So Riley, would you mind introducing us to your music – we read that you was once studying for a business degree, at what point did you feel the musical path was for you? 

Suppose that would be a good way to start things hey, my music is a bit of a collection of reflective alt-folk songs, or as my mum says “too many sad songs for my liking”. Yeah, that is true… I did a commerce degree out of school and just started getting more and more involved and interested in my music by the end of it all.

How is the music scene over in Perth, where you’re currently based? There’s a bit of an epidemic with so many small venues closing down over here in the UK. These venues are momentous to bands starting out. Would you say there’s a decent enough gig circuit in Perth? 

Perth is a great place besides the fact it’s so far away from everything. But even that has its positives sometimes. The scene here is like a massive family, everyone’s super supportive and the bands that break it are always so deserving because they’ve honed their craft here for so long. I know the East Coast has had a lot of that venue closing down nonsense. We’ve had a few but also a few new ones pop up. 

What outlet would you say gains you the biggest amount of interest when it comes to sharing your music/gaining a following – busking, gigs, social media, streaming services?

I always love busking… It’s such a terrific way to interact with people and try new things. I suppose it’s a combination of it all. I got lucky early on with some Spotify playlist love but I think nowadays its important to have somewhat of a presence everywhere…. As annoying as that is to maintain. 

So many bands start out busking and a few stay true to themselves, even when signed, keeping it real by continuing to perform in this way. How has this helped you and do you know of any local musicians that have gained success from putting their music out there in this way?

Yeh I started out busking at farmers markets on the weekend during high school, or the local fairs that came around each summer. I don’t do it as regularly as I’d like nowadays but still a couple of times a year. Melbourne’s busking scene is amazing, Perth has a bit of a stricter licensing system and there’s not as many places to play. Pierce Brothers and Tash Sultana are two of the big busking success stories out of there.

Tell us more about your latest single: ‘Misplaced’ – it certainly hooked us from first listen, hinting to bigger things, can we expect a debut album to soon follow?

Yeh, ‘Misplaced’ I wrote early on in a new relationship. I was unsure if anything was going to come from it because there we were such different people. I’m looking to have an EP out midway through next year.

What’s been the biggest inspiration to your musical style, I can definitely hear nuances of Bon Iver on ‘Misplaced’ and a little bit of Daughter on ‘Brave’… and Ben Howard definitely coming through your style of guitar playing.

I think there’s probably too many to list. I used to listen to The Fray on repeat when I was a kid because I loved his voice. The Jezabels are probably my favourite Australian band of all time and their influence probably comes through at times. Ben Howard and Bon Iver too (good pick) are also two of my faves. 

Where do you feel most inspired to write and record your music?

I don’t know if I have one particular place. I love a good balcony/porch songwriting session. At the moment it’s mostly in my garage or on my bed that I end up writing and recording. Being on the road and seeing new things always helps to get them ideas flowing.

What do you like to do outside of music?

I love my food…. My girlfriend runs a small little bagel stall at markets some weekends so you might find me chowing one down. Love a bit of basketball and footy too, so that often takes up a bit of my time. 

Have you travelled much both within and outside of Australia? If so, what places, situations, people, if any experiences, have fed into your writing? 

I was born in Melbourne, then lived in Holland for a few years when I was little. Moved to Perth when I was 8 and have lived there since. I did a semester studying in Montana and definitely caught the travel bug since. Being in new places and seeing the world with fresh eyes is hugely impactful on my writing. 

Have you been to/played/do you have any plans to tour Europe and the UK? 

I was lucky enough to head to London earlier this year and played two shows there. Things went really well so I’ll be back there in April next year for an extended period and will hopefully play some shows around Europe too. 

What are you currently working on?

I’m currently working on a new EP which I aim to put out next year, I’m also prepping my live set for tours around Australia in October.

And finally, do you have any new music recommendations from Australia that we ought to check out?

Was hoping you’d ask this…. Australia has so many great artists. 

  • Alexander Biggs
  • Neighbourhood Youth  
  • Gordi
  • Didirri

For you lucky Australian’s, be sure to catch Riley Pearce on tour next month, details/tickets here

Riley Pearce Oct Tour 17 Poster 123 Agency.jpg

For the rest of us, hold tight, kick back to Riley’s music and keep tabs on his European/UK Spring 2018 tour dates here!

Riley Pearce: Website // Twitter // Facebook

 

WORDS: RACHAEL CRABTREE (@ECCENTRIC_EEJIT)

Puzzle// Live Review// Hoxton, London

Live Reviews, Uncategorized
puzzle-will-steadman

Puzzle; Underbelly, Hoxton; 26/11/16

I first encountered PUZZLE this time last year, launching his debut single ‘Godlike’ at Electrowerkz in Angel. I remember it being bitterly cold that night, and the beer in the venue being virtually undrinkable. But the music, and the spectacle, left a warm impression on me. Incidentally, I also took a date along with me that night for company. As we left the gig I recall thinking I’d quite like to see Puzzle again; there was something really intriguing about him. He was different. The same couldn’t be said for the date however, so that ended there and then. Fast forward almost a year to the day and move only a few hundred metres down the road to the Hoxton Underbelly, and I’m here to see PUZZLE once more. And, again, I have a date in tow. And yes, it’s bitterly cold. Some things never change. This time though, I hope I’ll come one step closer to unlocking and comprehending the audio-visual enigma that awaits me.

This gig, by contrast to the last, is a more intimate affair and has less stage production. But the unique visuals that peaked my interest the last time prevail. PUZZLE, in the artist’s own words, ‘is all about escapism’, and presenting something on stage that people don’t get to see in their everyday lives. Aesthetically influenced by video games, fantasy books and Japanese cartoons. The result is tribal outfits, fluorescent makeup and animalistic masks. The concept is the result of the Brazilian-born and London-based artist’s desire to ‘explore the constant flux of human emotions through fantasy’. Add to the visuals a sonic blend of dark electro-pop, dance beats and emotionally intelligent songwriting and you’ve got a rare but exciting offering. Latest single ‘Comedown’ sounds like Frank Ocean and Robyn teamed up to write a song and got Depeche Mode to produce it – a kind of emotive synth-pop noir if you will. Sublime. puzzle-2-will-steadman

Of course a real puzzle is something you solve. It’s something to be unlocked. It tests you. And while I think it’s important one understands an artist, their message, their music, it’s also good to be challenged by it. It shouldn’t be too easy, too predictable. And that’s certainly not something you’d accuse PUZZLE of.

This time I leave feeling that this puzzle is certainly one based upon inquiry and discovery. It’s one I want to keep coming back to; one which invites you to try again. The beer was much better here too. Oh, and the date? We’ll see…

unlockpuzzle.com, Facebook, and Tweets as @unlockpuzzle

Writer and Photographer: Will Steadman: @steadman_will