Jeremy Tuplin // The Slaughtered Lamb // Live Review

Live Reviews, Uncategorized

Jeremy Tuplin and his band (The Ultimate Power Assembly) took to the stage in what was an overcrowded and intimate affair in the candle-lit basement of the iconic folk circuit venue, The Slaughtered Lamb.

Opening with the more autobiographical ‘Can We Be Strangers’, the set-list continued with all the songs from his latest album, Pink Mirror, alongside older classics such as ‘O Youth’ and ‘Albert Einstein Song’.

Significantly, the placement of the opening, middle and closing tracks were punctuated by the social commentary on the modern world from new tracks such as ‘Love’s Penitentiary’ and ‘Pandora’s Box’, with ‘The Machine’ placed somewhere in the middle, before closing the night with one of my favourites: ’The Beast’ allowing Jeremy’s own vulnerabilities as a writer to come through structurally in balance to exposing human natures dark sides.

Tuplin’s crowd interactions were nothing short of sharp commentary in-between songs, framing his understated and dry humoured character, levelling that of his singer-songwriter personality. Sharply astute to the trajectory of his laconic lines upon his listeners; we followed his poignancy with equal measures of laughter, often double taking what we heard, re-considering our interpretations before digesting hidden irony.

We fed off his idiosyncrasies and were all here tonight in what Jeremy described to us as an “album awareness concert” for his second album: ‘Pink Mirror’ (officially released: 5 April). We watched on as band and solo performances were separated by the non-performing members covering themselves with white sheets, like little ghouls upon stools. Tuplin even donned a pair of rose-tinted shades for ‘Pink Mirror’, “these are meant to be pink, but you can’t really see that. Well worth 15 quid” he jested.

As the evening developed it was really intriguing how Jeremy engaged with his audience – it was not only the familiar warmth, “It’s great to see so many of you, loads of music people, my friends and family, and strangers too, soon to be friends, I hope” but that role he takes as a performer and writer. His deadpan baritone delivery and half rhyming poetry navigated its way to our hearts. Essentially identifying that we are all flawed human beings, and making light both lyrically and through stage props, offering his performance as a both a piece of art – a gift conjured from dreams – and a sharp depiction of reality.

It is songs like ‘Bad Lover’ where art imitates life; lyrics hint towards his role as a songwriter: “Here we go again yet another account. Whatever’s inside me I’m gonna twist around and spit it out.” Whether that be “..astronaut dreams intended for your escape..or detail all the pieces of my poor broken heart” Jeremy writes to address various issues, either escapist dreamlike stories or personal accounts of heartbreak, for our benefit, and agreeably “altering minds one lyric at a time.”

In reverse, life imitates art with the song: ‘The Machine’; in his day-to-day life as a writer something begs him to question and reflect upon his life and profession: “Then I think of everything I do, think feel or see, it barely contributes to the economy” and yet we do also “suffer these same internal dialogues”.

Whether life imitates art or his art imitates life itself, Jeremy, however consciously, has developed a voice of his own and narrates the chaos of life and the intimacy of desire, vanity and representations of love in a way that is both pensive and witty. He is without doubt one of the most subversive songwriters and performers of our generation.

Pink Mirror is out on 5 April 2019 via Trapped Animal Records & Cargo Records

Follow Jeremy Tuplin on: Facebook // Twitter // Instagram

Words: Rachael Crabtree (@eccentric_eejit)

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The Great Escape Artist to Watch // Bishop Briggs

Live Reviews, Uncategorized

(Photographer: Elizabeth Andrade)

Excited by the prospect of hearing new music, I volunteered. Volunteering at the Great Escape Festival was an amazing opportunity to see so many up and coming bands, most of which I had never heard of and wouldn’t have otherwise seen.

One such artist was Bishop Briggs. I found myself in the Arch having been nearby for another gig, navigated by the Great Escape app, I was pleasantly surprised.

An artist of incredibly infectious eclectic electro-pop; I found myself unintentionally moving to the music. Everyone around me was similarly hypnotised. Each of the tracks flowed effortlessly, from ‘Wild Horses’ to ‘Hollow’ to ‘Dead Man’s Arm’s’ finishing with ‘River’. The style, eclectic, occasionally accompanied by electric guitar but always punctuated by electronic, synthy elements, and strong soulful vocals.

Originally known as Bishop, but due to a conflict with another band they had to change their name to Bishop Briggs. Having grown up in Japan, Hong Kong and now living in LA, must have shaped this unique sound.

With only three singles released to date, I cannot wait to buy the album, hopefully it’ll be with us soon…This autumn Briggs opens for Coldplay; it won’t be long until this artist is huge!

Writer: Elizabeth Andrade: @LizzyyEA

We captured a glimmer of the set for you…

 

LINKS

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/thatgirlbishop
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thatgirlbishop
Twitter: https://twitter.com/thatgirlbishop

Daylight Music at Union Chapel // Glass, Mathew Bourne and Darren Morris

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Glass

(GLASS; previous; Alexander Selby, above: Flyte’s Club Night; Elizabeth Andrade)

Tomorrow, (18/06/16) GLASS headline Union Chapel’s Daylight Music event. The first time I saw this upcoming electronic-duo was at Flyte’s Chasing Heaven Club Night. To be quite honest, the ‘Gig Of The Week’ very quickly became: ‘Gig of the Month’, as nothing has since compared to that magical night. The effervescence of Frontwoman, Jessica Winter can only be paralleled to the legend that is Kate Bush, singing and synth playing with such dark theatricality alongside partner, Scott Remington, who in turn, mirrors Jessica’s melodramatic chemistry through guitar and synthesiser. An idiosyncratic sound they describe as “CRANCE; cry and dance” transcends from the record-to-live impeccably.

The chapel setting will inevitably pave way for an echoey, ethereal performance, only to be accentuated by the use of a church organ, I think you too can only imagine how enchanting tomorrow will be…I hope you can join us!

GLASS

 

The accompanying support artists; Mathew Bourne and Darren Morris are two artists that I anticipate will be provide a beguiling filmic soundscape, bare of vocals, eerie, bordering on the melodramatic, painting a dark atmosphere suitably matched to that of their headliner counterparts; Glass.

 

Mathew Bourne

Mathew Bourne’s multi-instrumental jazz compositions are created through analogue synthesisers, tape delays, piano and cello’s ranging from the unpredictable piano melodies to the delicate orchestral scores across to the electronic experimentalism.

 

Darren Morris

Darren Morris a composer and collaborator, currently playing keys for Steve Mason (Beta Band) ranges from the quiet sombreness of dreamy organ chords to the quasi-psychedelic electronic sonic wall.

 

LINKS

GLASS

Website: http://www.glassmusic.co.uk
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/glassglassglassglass/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/glassmusic_
Mathew Bourne

Website: http://www.matthewbourne.com/about/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mortbutane/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/matthewbourne_
Darren Morris

Website: http://www.darrenmorrismusic.co.uk
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DarrenMorrisMusic

The Great Escape Artist To Watch // Kevin Garrett

Live Reviews, Uncategorized

(Photographer: Will Steadman)

With roughly 300 gigs across 30 venues throughout the city, The Great Escape presents myriad opportunities for discovering new music. So while it was difficult choosing what to see at this festival and industry convention deemed Britain’s SXSW, Kevin Garrett was one of the first additions to my festival planner and I was determined not to miss him.

So it was on Friday evening that I head east along the coast to St George’s, an imposing Anglican Church dating from the 1800s. This venue has recently seen Bat for Lashes and Benjamin Clementine perform, among others, and holds an impressive 3,000 people (although tonight it’s a little less full).

Kevin Garrett is 25 and comes from Brooklyn-by- way-of-Pittsburgh. His moving lyricism and top-class musicianship have been displayed in numerous projects recently and he’s shared the stage with the likes of James Vincent McMorrow, Emily King and Norah Jones. His debut EP ‘Mellow Drama’, which includes songs ‘Coloring’ and ‘Control’ received critical acclaim, although he is relatively unknown on these shores. When I first discovered him last year (on a random Spotify playlist) he immediately stood out.

Garrett, playing solo tonight, sits straight down at his keys in the eloquently lit altar and launches into his first song. This is Garrett’s “Brighton debut” as he reticently announces, two songs in, and after some obligatory jokes about the British weather, he precedes with a half hour set of his eclectic blend of pop, R&B and soul. While his solo set lacks some of the energy a backing band would bring, it actually suits the serene setting of the church and he keeps the entire audience engaged throughout. His heady and resonant vocals really carry in the space, while sorrow colours every word he sings. It’s a moving set.

There’s another Garrett doing particularly well on this side of the pond at the moment (Jack, the London-based singer, producer and multi-instrumentalist) but personally, I prefer this one, who just sold out St Pancras Old Church in London the Monday just gone. And that may just be a sign of things to come.

Writer: Will Steadman: @steadman_will

LINKS

Website: http://kevingarrettmusic.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/KevinOGarrett
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kevingarrettmusic/